Fred Talk – Blending skills.

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At school we use a puppet called Fred who can only speak in sounds, not whole words.  We call this Fred Talk.

For example, Fred would say d-o-g, we would say dog.  Your child is taught to hear sounds and blend them together in sequence to make a word.  We start with blending oral sounds, then progress to reading the letters and blending them together to read the word.

FRED TALK helps children read unfamiliar words by pronouncing each sound in the word one at a time. Children can start blending sounds into words as soon as they know a small group of letters well. Sound blending is essential in reading. Here are some ideas to help your child blend the sounds in words.

Some sounds are made of 2 letters together:

th         sh         qu        ch         ng        nk       ss         ll           gg         bb        ff          ay         ee

‘th’ is one sound (stick out your tongue, thhhhh) It is not a ‘t’ then ‘h’ sound.

Consonants together:

Some sounds are together in a word but are two diferetn pure sounds that need to be heard separately.

Skip                 Don’t pronounce it sk-i-p

Say the sounds s-k-i-p

Climb             Don’t say cl-i-mb

Say c-l-i-mb

Class              Don’t say cl-a-s-s

Say c-l-a-ss

Shoe             Don’t say s-h-o-e

Say sh-oo

Sink               Don’t say s-i-n-k

Say s-i-nk

Think            Don’t say t-h-i-n-k

Say th-i-nk  (It’s the pure sounds your child needs to hear)

 Difficulties with Fred Talk:

Always go back to oral Fred Talking. Using pictures or objects, ask your child to find the ‘c-a-t’ or ‘p-i-g’ for example – if they can put the spoken sounds together to find the correct picture, they will eventually learn to do the same with written sounds.

Games at home:  

  • Put out 3 pictures of objects: Pen, mop, dog.  Ask your child:  ‘Can you give me the ‘d-o-g’

At home, make it fun, talk to your child in Fred talk

‘Go and get your c-oa-t

‘Do you want to go to the p-ar-k?’

‘Can you touch your kn-ee-s?’

‘Can you touch your t-oe-s?’

‘Do you want t-oa-s-t for breakfast?’

‘It’s time for b-e-d.’

Remember to focus on sounds

Hope this helps – feedback always appreciated!

Mrs Quinn.

4 thoughts on “Fred Talk – Blending skills.

    • A digraph is a single sound, or phoneme, which is represented by two letters. A trigraph is a phoneme which consists of three letters. However, many people will simply use the term ‘digraph’ generally to describe both combinations. In digraphs, consonants join together to form a kind of consonant team, which makes a special sound. For instance, p and h combine to form ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in phonemic.

      When two or more consonants appear together and you hear each sound that each consonant would normally make, the consonant team is called a consonant blend. For instance, the word blend has two consonant blends: bl, for which you hear the sounds for both b and l, and nd, for which you hear the sounds for both n and d.

      Digraphs

      ch, which makes the /ch/ sound as in watch, chick, chimpanzee, and champion
      ck, which makes the /k/ sound as in chick
      ff, which makes the /f/ sound as in cliff
      gh, which makes the /g/ sound as in ghost and ghastly
      gn, which makes the /n/ sound as in gnome and gnarled
      kn, which makes the /n/ sound as in knife and knight
      ll, which makes the /l/ sound as in wall
      mb, which makes the /m/ sound as in lamb and thumb
      ng, which makes the /ng/ sound as in fang, boomerang, and fingerprint
      nk, which makes the /nk/ sound as in ink, sink and rink
      ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in digraph, phone, and phonics
      qu, which makes the /kw/ sound as in quick
      sh, which makes the /sh/ sound as in shore, shipwreck, shark, and shield
      ss, which makes the /s/ sound as in floss
      th, which makes the /th/ sound as in athlete, toothbrush, bathtub, thin, and thunderstorm
      th, which makes the /th/ sound as in this, there, and that
      wh, which makes the /hw/ sound as in where and which
      wr, which makes the /wr/ sound as in write
      zz, which makes the /z/ sound as in fuzz and buzz
      Trigraphs

      chr, which makes the /chr/ sound as in chrome and chromosome
      dge, which makes the /g/ sound as in dodge and partridge
      tch, which makes the /tch/ sound as in catch, match

  1. A digraph is a single sound, or phoneme, which is represented by two letters. A trigraph is a phoneme which consists of three letters. However, many people will simply use the term ‘digraph’ generally to describe both combinations. In digraphs, consonants join together to form a kind of consonant team, which makes a special sound. For instance, p and h combine to form ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in phonemic.

    When two or more consonants appear together and you hear each sound that each consonant would normally make, the consonant team is called a consonant blend. For instance, the word blend has two consonant blends: bl, for which you hear the sounds for both b and l, and nd, for which you hear the sounds for both n and d.

    Digraphs

    ch, which makes the /ch/ sound as in watch, chick, chimpanzee, and champion
    ck, which makes the /k/ sound as in chick
    ff, which makes the /f/ sound as in cliff
    gh, which makes the /g/ sound as in ghost and ghastly
    gn, which makes the /n/ sound as in gnome and gnarled
    kn, which makes the /n/ sound as in knife and knight
    ll, which makes the /l/ sound as in wall
    mb, which makes the /m/ sound as in lamb and thumb
    ng, which makes the /ng/ sound as in fang, boomerang, and fingerprint
    nk, which makes the /nk/ sound as in ink, sink and rink
    ph, which makes the /f/ sound as in digraph, phone, and phonics
    qu, which makes the /kw/ sound as in quick
    sh, which makes the /sh/ sound as in shore, shipwreck, shark, and shield
    ss, which makes the /s/ sound as in floss
    th, which makes the /th/ sound as in athlete, toothbrush, bathtub, thin, and thunderstorm
    th, which makes the /th/ sound as in this, there, and that
    wh, which makes the /hw/ sound as in where and which
    wr, which makes the /wr/ sound as in write
    zz, which makes the /z/ sound as in fuzz and buzz
    Trigraphs

    chr, which makes the /chr/ sound as in chrome and chromosome
    dge, which makes the /g/ sound as in dodge and partridge
    tch, which makes the /tch/ sound as in catch, match

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